The October harvest

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It was a meager month, October:

14 dozen eggs @800 = 11200
10 large cucumbers @50 = 500
4 lbs. hen-of-the-wood mushroom @150 = 600
8 lbs. potatoes @300 – 2400
2 lbs. acorns @1700 = 3400 (more on this later)
40 oysters @10 = 400
50 figs @25 (they were smaller than last month) = 1250
herbs and miscellanea @ 100

We’re supposed to get 30,000 each month (for 20% of our caloric needs), and we eked out only 19,850. This a significant backslide, since September saw us, for the first time, go over our year-to-date goal. Unfortunately, we were only about 8000 over, and being 10,000 under this month puts us back in deficit. If only we’d caught that tuna!

November, unless something goes terribly wrong, is going to put us back in the black. We’re scheduled to slaughter our six turkeys and three pigs (although only one of the pigs is for us), and that should make our year. Even if we don’t get a deer.

But there’s many a slip twixt the cup and the lip, and we don’t count our calories until they’re harvested.

This month’s highlight: several big hen-of-the-wood

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Comments

  1. Haha I wondered if acorns would find their way in. They are (questionably edible?) first-hand forage after all.

  2. Don’t be so hard on yourself….you’re doing way better than others- me especially.

    Unless we can count Steve’s beer, even though he has to buy the malt (which he does 50lbs at a time)..does that count?

  3. Hoosier Girl says:

    Tamar, how do you cook the hen of the woods? We found about 20 lbs worth in September up in Michigan, but I only kept about a pint to freeze, as it scared me a bit. They were really big.

    • HG, a HOTW is a beautiful thing, and bigger is better (unless it’s over the hill). We got ours in two batches. The first one, I made into a lovely, creamy, classic mushroom soup. The second (bigger) batch, Kevin harvested when I was out of town, and he cleaned it, cut it up, and sauteed it in butter until it was wilted but not fully cooked. I think getting some of the moisture out of it preserves the quality when you freeze it. Now, whenever we want mushrooms, we just defrost a few. They have so much flavor that you won’t be able to buy button mushrooms ever again.