Storm update

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Irene spared us.

The storm passed to our west, and we ended up getting less wind than had been predicted and no rain to speak of. Our property is littered with oak branches, pine cones, and various other arboreal debris, but no people, pets, livestock, vehicles, or outbuildings were damaged. I don’t count the small hole in the plastic cover of our hoophouse. A little duct tape, and it’ll be as good as new.

We lost power for about eight hours, and I found that I was glad to have a reason to untether myself from my computer and read an actual, genuine book. Our stove runs on propane, so I harvested and pickled the jalapenos that were getting a little long in the tooth. Every hour or so, I did a circuit of the property to check for damage and injuries.

One very big oak tree did come down, splitting about fifteen feet up and sending its top crashing into the woods. We were outside, and saw it happen. It hit nothing, but it had me listening for the crack of large-diameter lumber breaking for the rest of the day.

The wind was out of the south, and there were rare, surfable waves on the north side of the Cape, in Cape Cod Bay. Kevin and Les wanted to give them a whirl, but the beaches were closed.

We haven’t been out to check our oysters, but Kevin went with Les to look at some of his, the ones that they can walk out to, and they were fine. We don’t anticipate any real damage.

We hadn’t done much in the way of preparation. We’ve got plenty of food for us and the animals, and we have an emergency water supply in the form of a lake, whose water we could boil and filter if it came to that. We did some stowing and securing, and made sure the truck had gas, but our stocking up was done primarily at Cotuit Liquor rather than Home Depot. You can’t weather a hurricane without wine.

We weathered the hurricane, and all is well. Our thoughts are with those for whom all is not.

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Comments

  1. amanda blum says:

    damnit. i need a hurricane to sweep through PDX so i can harvest some mushroom growing logs. glad to hear you got through ok:)

  2. Glad you fared well, but I’m sorry to hear about the oak. I’m so partial to old oaks – seems like the loss of a great friend.

  3. I’m glad you came through OK. I’m likewise sorry to hear about the big oak. Two summers ago the city took down the huge maple tree we had out front because it was splitting and I still miss it.

    I just heard of a show on TLC about preparing for the apocalypse that involves hoarding alcohol and silver to barter. I’m pretty sure I’d be unwilling to part with any of my alcohol.

  4. accidental Mick says:

    Thanks for the update Tamar – Rlekieved you both came through (realtively) unscathed.

  5. accidental Mick says:

    Releived even!

  6. That’s great news. I can cancel my trip to Portugal to retrieve your oysters.

    Cotuit Liquors…I like how you guys prepare for the worst.

  7. Glad to hear you’re okay down there.

    Things are rough up here: roads washed out, bridges swept away, downtowns flooded, several fellow volunteer firefighters from a neighboring town swept away during a rescue attempt, their fates unknown. Our home is fine and we are safe.

  8. Glad to hear you’re OK!!!

    Of the people I know who were in Irene’s path, you two seemed to be about the most exposed of anyone. Glad you came through OK.

  9. Glad to hear that you guys are safe and dry. We had a little Irene too; the wind never above 30 kts, about 7 inches of rain, some branches and limbs down. The calm after the storm is quite beautiful blue and fresh. The panic before the storm was curious; it seems the innate altruism of the species is excited by a common fear that the best of intentions will be frustrated by the whims of scatterbrained mother nature; all those folks out and about helping out, sharing, reading the intentions of strangers and leaping at the chance to help them get the job done. Of course, Kant, who lacked our modern science, was closer to the mark than Bernard Mandeville, JS Mill, or Adam Smith; we do unto others not because we are knaves turned honest in a grumbling hive, nor for utility or practicality, nor because the invisible hand turns our selfish cranks into philanthropists with unintended beneficiaries, but because it is in our genes. We are naturally altruistic. We need no training and no instruction. In fact, instruction and reward can retard the natural altruism we are born with.

  10. My boss is headed Capeward on vacation, if he didn’t get there last night. Oddly, here in southern Vermont, we’ve had LOTS of damage. Roads, bridges, buildings swept away, water mains broken. And yet, we had very little wind and it didn’t seem to be raining all that hard. But we’re a declared disaster area, with plenty of justification.

  11. Myrna Bowman says:

    Glad you are safe!

  12. Thanks. Everyone. It’s nice to know people are thinking of us when things like this happen.

    Tovar and Stefka, we’re thinking of you. Vermont got inundated with flood waters, and we’re hearing stories of terrible damage. Our friend Dave, who lives near Manchester, reported that a good portion of downtown washed away. He’is safe and sound in his house high on the hill, but the estimate he got for getting his power back is “one to ten days.”

    Hurricanes suck.

  13. Hi Tamar,

    Glad that you and Kevin didn’t have too much damage but then Irene die down when it came a shore for the second time here in NYC, we were lucky it died but I sure the people upstate didn’t think so, they seem to have gotten the worse of the storm.

    We stocked up with brownie mix, ginger bread mix and potato chips, these are basic needs when you have kids.

    Sad part of all this is when the next big storm comes norcth people are going to think of they can ride it out since Irene was not as bad as it could have been it they could be very wrong, but then it will be too late.